I Write Like

Share

Link to share

Now available for
iPhone, iPad and Mac!

Download on the App Store

Features available only in the app:

  • Top rankings and probabilities. In addition to showing you the most similar author, you can view the top 3 likely candidates and the probabilities of their style matching yours.
  • Statistics and readability. The app shows the character, word, and sentence counts, and analyzes your text for readability to show you the readability score and how long it would take to read it.
  • Save texts and sync them across your devices with iCloud. The web version just processes your text and discards it, while the app version stores it on your device. It also transparently syncs your texts via iCloud across your iPhone, iPad, and Mac.
  • Private, on-device analysis. With the app, you don’t have to be connected to the Internet to analyze your texts and you don’t have to send your writings to our server for processing.
  • No text length limits. The web version is limited to about 30 kilobytes of text. The app doesn’t the limit, so you can process larger texts.

About Isaac Asimov

Picture of Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (born Isaak Yudovich Ozimov, c. January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American author and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. Asimov was one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. His works have been published in all ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (although his only work in the 100s—which covers philosophy and psychology—was a foreword for The Humanist Way).

Asimov is widely considered a master of hard science fiction and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov's most famous work is the Foundation Series; his other major series are the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series, both of which he later tied into the same fictional universe as the Foundation Series to create a unified "future history" for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He wrote many short stories, among them Nightfall, which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.

The prolific Asimov also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as much non-fiction. Most of his popular science books explain scientific concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. He often provides nationalities, birth dates, and death dates for the scientists he mentions, as well as etymologies and pronunciation guides for technical terms. Examples include Guide to Science, the three volume set Understanding Physics, Asimov's Chronology of Science and Discovery, as well as works on astronomy, mathematics, the Bible, William Shakespeare's writing and chemistry.

The asteroid 5020 Asimov, a crater on the planet Mars, a Brooklyn, New York elementary school, and one Isaac Asimov literary award are named in his honor.

Read more on Wikipedia

IWL is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.